Climate Justice Takes Backseat As Governmental Support For Big Oil Thrives. It’s Now Difficult To Tell Apart Political Denialists From Activists

Climate Change is not necessarily opposed only by open denialists, but the champions of its opposition.

What’s good for the economy is bad for the environment. What’s bad for the environment is bad for the economy. It may seem like a merry go round but only one of these statements can lead the way, with the latter preferable in order to awaken stammers in advancements to break the climate storm.

We have come to a moment in history that will either be encased in rejoice or forgotten in the catacombs of archaeology. Our only hope to reverse the irreversible is tangled in the bureaucracy of a political system embossed by the personal ideas and beliefs of those who lead them. This is where productivity brakes and apathy introduces itself as the foreseen curveball stumping our movements as activists.

As unfortunate as it sounds, demonstrations, pageantry and performance pieces only serve to sustain an abnormal system that encourages the business acumen of industry and parliament. It is a welcome distraction to those who profit from the unfortunate bane we battle. The battle to reserve what we have and to bring it back to life, because as it stands we have already lost too much.

The alliance on offer for anyone seeking to campaign against ecological breakdown is counterproductive and fragmented. We have too many groups with too many views and though they share the same end goal, methods to acquire it stifle a way of getting there.

But the biggest challenge we face right now, is an inability for the general public to tell apart, the difference between denialists and supporters of big oil. The G7 was a masterclass in why we should hold to account global governments, especially figures who run on the basis of climate restoration, like Joe Biden, but fail to do the right thing. The United States may have rejoined the Paris Climate Accords, but the G7 summit’s inertia regarding the ecological crisis is telling and scary.

It’s time to end government subsidies for big oil once and for all and to offer them only to clean energy companies 100% involved in renewable technologies.

We must vote for the right people and hold them to account before they gain our tick. They must be constantly reminded before and after ascending to office that they must not backtrack on pledges made. Without a change in policy, we seek only to sustain the current course of outcome. An outcome where we all lose.