Climate Crimes Against Humanity: IPCC Report Is A Damning Indictment Of Poor Leadership

IPCC report says human influence is to blame over the alarming rate of warming caused to the planet.

We’re close to runaway warming according to the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change.

The rate of increase was cited as disturbing and unprecedented within the last 2,000 years.

As expected, the report says that flooding, droughts and extreme heat will be of increased risk to human health and a more frequent occurrence as the planet is set to hit the 1.5 Celsius limit.

The report, which was released today cited research and sources which irrefutably points towards human induced anthropogenic climate destruction.

In the report, the IPCC says: “It is virtually certain that the land surface will continue to warm more than the ocean surface (likely 1.4 to 1.7 times more). It is virtually certain that the Arctic will continue to warm more than global surface temperature, with high confidence above two times the rate of global warming.”

All governments have agreed with the findings, putting all leaders in the dock should they fail to heed the report.

This includes switching swiftly to renewable based sources of energy, non-destructive forms of packaging and looking to solutions to curb emissions.

Boris Johnson has said that the report makes for “sobering reading” despite failing to act upon prior reports saying the same.

The report says that should we do nothing, the Earth is set to hit 1.5 Celsius by 2040, and a path of irreversible runaway heating.

UN Secretary-General, António Guterres says: “Today’s IPCC Working Group 1 Report is a code red for humanity.”

The main cause of the climate emergency has been an increase of greenhouse gases, which includes the burning of oil, production of methane (mostly by livestock including cattle) and the use of gas and emissions by vehicles.

This means the main source of emissions has been from corporate entities which includes oil and gas manufacturers and mass production by food organisations.

Multinationals are indirectly footing much of the blame in the report through wide scale production and destructive practices including the logging of rainforests, exploration for fossil fuels and wasteful packaging use.

Sea level rise is of particular concern with 40% of the world’s population living within 100 kilometres of a coastal region.

According to NASA, sea levels have increased by 4.0mm since 1995.

To find out more, read the full report here.