Climate: Rain Falls On Greenland Ice Sheet For The First Time Raising Concern Among Scientists

Rainfall at the Greenland ice sheet was so unexpected scientists lacked the equipment to measure it.

Scientists working from a research station situated 10,551 ft above sea level witnessed the phenomena as temperatures rose above freezing. This is now the third time in ten years temperatures have behaved this way, causing widespread concern among climatologists.

Climate breakdown creates unpredictable weather patterns that cause a variety of temperatures and phenomena throughout the world. This includes flooding, snow at unexpected times to the more anticipated wildfires currently raging across the globe.

According to the Colorado based National Snow and Ice Data Centre (NSIDC) this is the fourth time in history rain has fallen at the summit of Greenland’s ice cap since records were first collected there in 1950.

Ted Scambos of the NSIDC told CNN “What is going on is not simply a warm decade or two in a wandering climate pattern”… “This is unprecedented.” He continued: “We are crossing thresholds not seen in millennia, and frankly this is not going to change until we adjust what we’re doing to the air.”

Due to the nature of their work, researchers based at the station were taken by surprise, so much so, they lacked the equipment specificity to collate any data from the event.

The effects of the climate crisis have caused unprecedented temperatures to materialise. More recently, it has caused untold wildfire damage in the Arctic region while 200 billion tonnes of water was lost from the Greenland ice sheet this summer alone.