Climate Change Update – The Latest Headlines

Latest regarding the impacts of climate breakdown from around the globe.

Pasta could cost as much as 50% more

The Guardian reports that the cost of pasta could rise as much as 50% due to a ‘disastrous’ growing season.

Canada is the biggest producer of key ingredient durum wheat, but the country experienced problems due to extreme temperatures and drought.

They quote Jason Bull, director of Eurostar Commodities who said he “…estimated a 500g packet of spaghetti could increase in price by 60p, or 50%, to £1.80.”

Bread prices too?

The cost of bread has also been hit due to the same issue of dry weather with supplies still in demand but costs going up. The Wall Street Journal says wheat stocks are in “very poor condition.”

Fossil fuels must stay underground

That’s the message of leading scientists and researchers if we are to remain within the 1.5c temperature threshold.

“Through the Covid pandemic, we have seen a large decline in production – but that is bouncing back,” said Dr Steve Pye, UCL associate professor of energy systems in an interview with the BBC. His colleague, Dr James Price of UCL concurred saying: “We say to our model, ‘Meet all those demands from now until 2100 without emitting too much carbon dioxide.”

“The result we get is a rapid reduction in fossil fuels – and a large amount of fossils fuels [left in the ground] – simply because the carbon budget is so tight.”

Catastrophic Tsunamis pose great risk to human life

Another researcher at UCL, Bill McGuire, who gave a speech at the British Science Festival told how huge submarine earthquakes could trigger large scale tsunamis off the coast of Greenland due to thinning ice sheets reports the Financial Times. This may also pose a threat to North America and likely Europe as well.

UK folds under pressure in British/Australian trade deal

In discussions for a potential trade deal, Australia demanded that any Paris climate accord commitments be dropped.

The demands undermine the UK’s existing commitments to become carbon neutral, diluting any efforts made within the British Isles.

The Australian government are notoriously difficult to negotiate with when it comes to mitigating climate change. The Canberra government has little to no plan to remedy the situation despite devastating forest fires and river pollution.

Image: US Government